Anne de Vries, 'Trails of the Hive Mind', 2012, exhibition view
Anne de Vries, 'Trails of the Hive Mind', 2012, exhibition view 'FORECAST' 2011
by Anne de Vries

Material: Full HD video installation
Text: Bertrand Russell 
Sound: James Whipple

'The Days of Aquarius'
by Anne de Vries

Material: blue solvent ink printed on a role of vinyl
Size: 180 cm x 42 meter

This work contains a calendar presenting all days of the age of aquarius, the 2150 year long period that presumably started on 1962-04-02 and continues up to 4122-04-02. 'FORECAST' 2011 by Anne de Vries Material: Full HD video installation Text: Bertrand Russell Sound: James Whipple 'The Days of Aquarius' by Anne de Vries Material: blue solvent ink printed on a role of vinyl Size: 180 cm x 42 meter This work contains a calendar presenting all days of the age of aquarius, the 2150 year long period that presumably started on 1962-04-02 and continues up to 4122-04-02. 'Timetables' 2011
by Anne de Vries

Material: wooden tables with digital photoprint
             and ceramic sculptures.

'Timetables' 2011 by Anne de Vries Material: wooden tables with digital photoprint and ceramic sculptures. Time Stone, 2011
by Anne de Vries

documentation of sculpture
size: 135 cm x 65 cm x 25 cm

XXL mobile device displaying the infrastructure around stonehenge via google maps. the work flirts with being a mobile grave for the mythical history of this prehistoric monument. Time Stone, 2011 by Anne de Vries documentation of sculpture size: 135 cm x 65 cm x 25 cm XXL mobile device displaying the infrastructure around stonehenge via google maps. the work flirts with being a mobile grave for the mythical history of this prehistoric monument. Anne de Vries, 'CAVE2CAVE', 2010, photographs of the reflections of cave paintings in wrinkled mirror foil, 140 x 95 cm Anne de Vries, 'CAVE2CAVE', 2010, photographs of the reflections of cave paintings in wrinkled mirror foil, 140 x 95 cm Katanga Bub, 2011
by Anne de Vries

- The extreme ends of the mobile device industry are brought together in 'Katanga Bub'. It is based on a press image depicting the landscape and workers of Katanga, in The Democratic Republic of Congo - an area mined for many minerals like tungsten and coltan, which have been crucial for the manufacture of mobile devices.
For this work the press image of the Katanga mines has been re-photographed underwater and set within a freestanding display unit. as water ripples and bubbles float over the surface, distorting the scene underneath, the screens of numerous mobile phones show clearer details of the same view of the Katanga mine. The elemental earthy origins of the mines are (re)connected with the liquefied luxuriance of global technology commodities and their marketing aesthetics, to express the easy exchange of information through these devices.
This work fuses two opposing but connected ends of the story: on one hand the mobile devices help spread knowledge and raise global awareness, with the false promise of engendering a better world. On the other hand, while the economy of "rare earths" props up the problematic social and political infrastructures of the Democratic Republic of Congo, it also reveals the recursive relationships between matter and information underwritten by the move from production to product; from raw material to data generation.

'Katanga Bub'

The extreme ends of the mobile device industry are brought together in 'Katanga Bub'. It is based on a press image depicting the landscape and workers of Katanga, in The Democratic Republic of Congo - an area mined for many minerals like tungsten and coltan, which have been crucial for the manufacture of mobile devices.
For this work the press image of the Katanga mines has been re-photographed underwater and set within a freestanding display unit. as water ripples and bubbles float over the surface, distorting the scene underneath, the screens of numerous mobile phones show clearer details of the same view of the Katanga mine. The elemental earthy origins of the mines are (re)connected with the liquefied luxuriance of global technology commodities and their marketing aesthetics, to express the easy exchange of information through these devices.
This work fuses two opposing but connected ends of the story: on one hand the mobile devices help spread knowledge and raise global awareness, with the false promise of engendering a better world. On the other hand, while the economy of "rare earths" props up the problematic social and political infrastructures of the Democratic Republic of Congo, it also reveals the recursive relationships between matter and information underwritten by the move from production to product; from raw material to data generation.
Katanga Bub, 2011 by Anne de Vries - The extreme ends of the mobile device industry are brought together in 'Katanga Bub'. It is based on a press image depicting the landscape and workers of Katanga, in The Democratic Republic of Congo - an area mined for many minerals like tungsten and coltan, which have been crucial for the manufacture of mobile devices. For this work the press image of the Katanga mines has been re-photographed underwater and set within a freestanding display unit. as water ripples and bubbles float over the surface, distorting the scene underneath, the screens of numerous mobile phones show clearer details of the same view of the Katanga mine. The elemental earthy origins of the mines are (re)connected with the liquefied luxuriance of global technology commodities and their marketing aesthetics, to express the easy exchange of information through these devices. This work fuses two opposing but connected ends of the story: on one hand the mobile devices help spread knowledge and raise global awareness, with the false promise of engendering a better world. On the other hand, while the economy of "rare earths" props up the problematic social and political infrastructures of the Democratic Republic of Congo, it also reveals the recursive relationships between matter and information underwritten by the move from production to product; from raw material to data generation. 'Katanga Bub' The extreme ends of the mobile device industry are brought together in 'Katanga Bub'. It is based on a press image depicting the landscape and workers of Katanga, in The Democratic Republic of Congo - an area mined for many minerals like tungsten and coltan, which have been crucial for the manufacture of mobile devices. For this work the press image of the Katanga mines has been re-photographed underwater and set within a freestanding display unit. as water ripples and bubbles float over the surface, distorting the scene underneath, the screens of numerous mobile phones show clearer details of the same view of the Katanga mine. The elemental earthy origins of the mines are (re)connected with the liquefied luxuriance of global technology commodities and their marketing aesthetics, to express the easy exchange of information through these devices. This work fuses two opposing but connected ends of the story: on one hand the mobile devices help spread knowledge and raise global awareness, with the false promise of engendering a better world. On the other hand, while the economy of "rare earths" props up the problematic social and political infrastructures of the Democratic Republic of Congo, it also reveals the recursive relationships between matter and information underwritten by the move from production to product; from raw material to data generation.