Diverse identities, cultures, theories and convictions come together in Margaret Haines’ work, which shifts between different media as well as cultural influences. Her project Coco uses film, a book, a clothing line and accessories, to tell the story of a girl named Coco, who relies on visionary experiences to sift delusion
from sincerity, and commercial girlhood from trauma. In the publication for this work, Haines introduces an alternative to Coco, via the artist, mystic and cult figure Cameron, whom Haines continues to research through her role as board member of Cameron’s foundation.

Haines’ latest work, The Stars Down To Earth, draws on various sources from Hollywood to avant-garde and feminist theory. The film features the mythological Cassandra, who can predict the future but will never be believed, wandering the streets of Los Angeles. This sense of fatalism is heightened by astrologers’ predictions for the state of current and actual events of 2015/2016. The work’s title refers to a 1952/53 essay by philosopher Theodor Adorno, which criticizes the irrationality of mass culture via examining the astrology column of Carroll Righter, whose students also act in the film.
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'The Stars Down To Earth', 2015, video still, dimensions variable 'The Stars Down To Earth', 2015, video still, dimensions variable 'X Filles * Psychic Trauma', 2014, installation, dimensions variable 'X Filles * Psychic Trauma', 2014, installation, dimensions variable 'COCO', 2014, 43 min., color/sound 'COCO', 2014, 43 min., color/sound