Appletree #2 - White Privilege A Workshop for Beginners

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We regret to inform you that the event 'White Privilege A Workshop for Beginners' is now fully booked. We will however make the audio recordings of the workshop available after the event.
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Appletree #2 -
White Privilige
A Workshop for beginners *

A workshop on White Privilege conceived and led by artist Maria Guggenbichler as part of the programme Appletree, curated by Vincent van Velsen.

Wednesday 27 March, 16:00 – 18:00
(doors open at 15:45)
Rijksakademie Reading Room

Admission is free, but reservation is required. you can reserve your seat here.


* Although (because) they’re the inventors of white supremacy and also the experts in profiting from it, white people are also specialists in not knowing whiteness – hence ‘for beginners.’
 
The life-threatening (deadly) consequences of white supremacy are the daily lived reality of people of colour globally, yet they remain invisible to those who “believe themselves as white” (Ta-Nehisi Coates). Those who benefit from white racial privilege don’t see (read: un-see, read: ignore) whiteness permanently. Given the comfort which comes with it, not surprisingly white people naturalize their privilege; although unearned, it feels normal to them, as much a given as unremarkable.
 
In utter denial, white people demand “black labour for proof” (Patricia Schor) of systematic and everyday racism, of the real-ness and effects of white supremacy, but they also demand the time and labour of people of colour to educate them about their own whiteness. 
 
Audre Lorde: “Black and Third World people are expected to educate white people as to our humanity. Women are expected to educate men. Lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world. The oppressors maintain their position and evade their responsibility for their own actions.”
 
Goal of the workshop is to “return the problem of whiteness to white people” (George Yancy) and open the uncomfortable space for those with racial privilege to do the work, self-examine, educate and confront themselves with their privileged, which also always means oppressing, position. From this position, what does it mean to “take responsibility for one’s own actions?”
 
The workshop takes the form of a reading-listening session. It will use texts by scholar Peggy McIntosh and by writer Claudia Rankine to name the norm and understand white supremacy as systematic, as a political fiction and investment, as a technology of domination, as terror, as spatial and necro-political operation.
 
Confronting (white) privilege will only be possible, I believe, if we address as clearly as is possible the here and now of our conversation, of our gathering. Given the location at an art institution, it will be necessary to discuss the role of culture, its protocols and institutions, in the reproduction of white supremacy; as well as the complicity/agency for resistance of those working in the field.
 
The reading materials can be found here:
– Peggy McIntosh: White Privilege and Male Privilege (1988)
– Claudia Rankine: In Our Way – Racism in Creative Writing (2016)

Bio Maria Guggenbichler
Maria Guggenbichler thinks and un-thinks, laughs, dances, plays, collaborates, doubts, listens, talks, walks, organizes, works and sabotages, publishes and hides, and spoils the broth – with too many cooks, fellow strangers, and friends. Maria works in long-term and close collaborations and friendships. 
Together with Amal Alhaag, Maria initiated and ran the Side Room, a discursive platform for excentric cultural practices and intersectional thinking (2013-2016). Amal and Maria have been collaborating on many other events, programs, and pranks. 

www.mariaguggenbichler.xyz
Image via Deniz Unal / do you mind; and as well via Zubeyda Muzeyyen / DJ Haram Image via Deniz Unal / do you mind; and as well via Zubeyda Muzeyyen / DJ Haram

Shortlist Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019

Rijksakademie alumni Pauline Curnier Jardin (RA 15/16) and Katja Novitskova (RA 13/14) are among the four shortlisted artists for the Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019.

Statements from the jury:

Pauline Carnier Jardin convinced the jury with her transgressive artistic practice adopting visual and narrative elements as much from the theatre tradition as from narrative cinema. Her often humorous works are the outcome of an individual approach towards historical situations and the collective repertoire of stories, religious and cultural traditions, and mythologies by transposing them into a contemporary experimental language. The jury was especially drawn to her approach towards gender roles, diversity of identityand queerness*, addressed from the position of a "precarious feminism".

One of the pioneers of an artistic language that became known as 'post internet art', Katja Novitskova convinced the jury with the virtuosity and complexity with which she brings together images of nature and technology. Her immersive sculptural environments address the transformation of organic bodies into digital data and attempt, so to speak, a re-materialization of our extensively virtual world. Capturing the process of transformation, she creates futuristic landscapes and maps of information and exemplifies the growing inadequacy of the division between the real and the virtual.



A joint exhibition of the artists’ work will be shown from August 16, 2019 to January 12, 2020 at Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin. The prizewinner will be chosen on 12 September, the award consists of a solo exhibition with a catalogue at one of the institutions of Berlin’s Nationalgalerie in the fall of 2020.
 
Pauline Curnier Jardin, 'Grotta Profunda Approfundita', 2017, installation-film, installation view, 'Viva Arte Viva, Arsenale, 57th Venice Biennale (photo Daniele Zoiko) Pauline Curnier Jardin, 'Grotta Profunda Approfundita', 2017, installation-film, installation view, 'Viva Arte Viva, Arsenale, 57th Venice Biennale (photo Daniele Zoiko) Katja Novitskova (photo Lutz Leitmann) Katja Novitskova (photo Lutz Leitmann) Katja Novitskova, Pattern of Activation (eyes of the world), 2017, installation, sculpture, sound, various media. From solo exhibition for Estonian Pavilion for the 57th Venice Biennale, 2017. Courtesy of the artist, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin (photo Anu Vahtra) Katja Novitskova, Pattern of Activation (eyes of the world), 2017, installation, sculpture, sound, various media. From solo exhibition for Estonian Pavilion for the 57th Venice Biennale, 2017. Courtesy of the artist, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin (photo Anu Vahtra)

Sharjah Biennial 14: Leaving the Echo Chamber

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Sharjah Biennial 14
Leaving the Echo Chamber
7 March  - 10 June


Programme Opening Week & March Meeting


The 14th edition of the Sharjah Biennial (SB14), Leaving the Echo Chamber, explores the possibilities and purpose of producing art when news is fed by a monopoly of sources, history is increasingly fictionalised, when ideas of ‘society’ are invariably displaced, when borders and beliefs are dictated by cultural, social and political systems.

Curators Zoe Butt, Omar Kholeif and Claire Tancons, who have collaboratively conceived the SB14 theme, present three distinct exhibitions bringing together a range of experiences and works to create a series of provocations about how one might re-negotiate the shape, form, and function of the "echo chamber" of contemporary life, towards a multiplying of the echoes within, such vibration representative of the vast forms of human production —its rituals, beliefs and customs.

Participating Rijksakademie alumni:

Journey Beyond the Arrow
- curated by Zoe Butt -

Anawana Haloba
Meiro Koizumi
Mark Salvatus


Making New Time
- curated by Omar Kholeif -

Otobong Nkanga
Pamela Rosenkranz
Kemang Wa Lehulere


Look for Me All Around You
- curated by Claire Tancons -

Meschac Gaba
Matthew Lutz-Kinoy


 

Out of Office - Art in business

Out of Office - art in business
Singer Museum, Laren (NH)
11 december 2018 - 7 april 2019


Under the title Out of Office - art in business, Singer Laren, in collaboration with the Vereniging Bedrijfscollecties Nederland (VBCN), offers an art-historical overview of 75 years of Dutch art from corporate collections.

Participating alumni:

Tjebbe Beekman
Melanie Bonajo
Elspeth Diederix
Gijs Frieling
Folkert de Jong
Gert Jan Kocken
Michael Raedecker
Marie-José Robben
Sarah van Sonsbeeck
Berend Strik
Fiona Tan
Esther Tielemans
Helen Verhoeven
Koen Vermeule
Roy Villevoye
Evi Vingerling


Parallel to Out of Office - art in business, the museum is showing the exhibition RE:Collecting, which includes works by alumni Persijn Broersen & Margit Lukács and Ryan Gander.

publication date 20-12-2018

Tushar Joag (1966-2018)

We are saddened by the news that on Tuesday 18 December 2018 artist-activist and Rijksakademie alumnus Tushar Joag passed away unexpectedly.

Tushar and his wife Sharmila Samant were both residents at the Rijksakademie in 1998 and 1999. After returning to Mumbai, they founded the artist-led initiative 'Open Circle', one of the first platforms of the Rijksakademie Artists Initiatives Network (RAIN). Open Circle (1999-2008) was an artist collective that sought to engage with contemporary socio-political issues via an integration of theory and practice.

Tushar described himself as a public intervention artist. He founded the Public Work Cells, an organisation that worked “to create works of art that seek to make interventions in the urban space, by designing and producing objects that while being functional and aesthetic bring into focus the various concerns of the immediate situation”.

In recent years he taught at Shiv Nadar University of Arts in Greater Noida, where he and Sharmila set up the Masters of Arts programme.

Over the past few weeks, Tushar had been helping to assemble a forum called Artists Unite, which recently issued a statement signed by 450 painters, writers and filmmakers warning that “democracy is not a majoritarian project to identify enemies and enforce uniformity of language, behaviour and culture”. It added, “Democracy is the celebration of a collective will for peace, of living together with dignity and equality.”

Our hearts are with Sharmila, his children Kattyayani & Kashyap, and his family and friends.
 
Tushar Joag in 2016 (photo www.ficart.org) Tushar Joag in 2016 (photo www.ficart.org)

publication date 4-10-2018

Shortlist Future Generation Art Prize 2019

Rijksakademie alumni Monira Al Qadiri (RA 16/17) and Yu Araki (guestresident in 2018) are shortlisted for the fith edition of the Future Generation Art Prize.

The Future Generation Art Prize is a biannual global contemporary art prize open to all artists aged 35 or younger from anywhere in the world, working in any medium. Shortlisted artists will be commissioned to create new works on view in exhibitions at the PinchukArtCentre in Kyiv (1 February - 14 April) and the Venice Biennale (9 May - September 2019).

The Future Generation Art Prize 2019 Award Ceremony will take place in March 2019.

publication date 6-3-2018

Em’kal Eyongakpa receives Henrike Grohs Art Award

Rijksakademie alumnus Em’kal Eyongakpa (born 1981 in Mamfe, Cameroon) is the first recipient of the Henrike Grohs Art Award, conceived by the Goethe-Institut and the Grohs family. He will be awarded with a € 20.000 cash prize on 13 March 2018 in Abidjan.

The jury states: “The jury unanimously awards the inaugural Henrike Grohs Art Award to Em’kal Eyongakpa for his poetic, subtle and subjective approach. His work expresses universal concerns of humanity. The multidisciplinary stance of his practice that includes knowledge derived from science, ethnobotany, magical realism, experimentation and utopia, aptly responds to the core values of the Henrike Grohs Art Award.”


The Henrike Grohs Art Award is a biennial prize dedicated to artists who are living and working in Africa and practicing in the field of visual arts. It recognises the lifetime achievements of the former Head of the Goethe-Institut in Abidjan, Henrike Grohs, who was killed on 13 March 2016 in a terrorist attack in Grand-Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire.

Klaus-Dieter Lehmann, President of the Goethe-Institut: “We have not only lost a highly esteemed and beloved colleague in Henrike Grohs but also a person who carried hope into the world with her beliefs and actions. Therefore, it is of particular importance to link the memory of Henrike Grohs to a viewpoint that reflects her work and desires. This has come to fruition in the prize, as it promotes the cause of Henrike Grohs: To support African creative artists and make a contribution towards international dialogue. I would like to congratulate the first prize winner Em’kal Eyongakpa with whom, after an intensive selection process, the judges have made an excellent choice.”

Jury members

- Koyo Kouoh (Artistic Director, RAW Material Company, Dakar)
- Laurence Bonvin (artist and representative of the Grohs family, Berlin)
- Raphael Chikukwa (Chief Curator, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare)
- Simon Njami (Curator, Paris)

More information

Em'kal Eyongakpa
Henrike Grohs Award