'i don’t need to make sense, i just need to let it go', 2018, video, looped, 20 min. Produced by Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, courtesy of the artist and LambdaLambdaLambda Gallery 'i don’t need to make sense, i just need to let it go', 2018, video, looped, 20 min. Produced by Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, courtesy of the artist and LambdaLambdaLambda Gallery

Relentless partial attention fuels the online textual hysteria on which the Zagreb-born, Amsterdam-based performance artist bases her spoken-word performances. It is the spirit she embodies while delivering them.
 
As in our digitally mediated reality, in Turato’s performance works things are happening too fast to take in: all you can do is submit to her speedboat energy, skim along the surface in her wake. Turato moves at the pace of the infosphere – she harvests, processes, and performs social preoccupations, as well as the language generated as they trend, peak, and dip.
 
For those of us immersed in the language of the tiny screen – online journals, blogs, social media, message boards, comments sections, clickbait, motivational quotes – Turato’s text is all déjà vu, familiar but unplaceable. ‘Sentiment is ok, sentimentality is not’, she announces. ‘Multiple partners? In this economy? How often do you see your children?’
 
Beyond the energy of the performances themselves, Turato’s work might also be described as collage or appropriation. In recent printed works – posters, wallpaper, and silk scarves – she has favoured a graphic style that resembles the blocky warnings featured on cigarette packets. The texts that form the basis for both these and her spoken-word performances are amalgamated as Turato reads everything from e-books to the comments section of perfume review sites. Language dates fast in these parts: last week’s meme already carries the stink of its superannuation.
 
As she retires each text piece, Turato records them as a typographic video, single words flashing up at the speed of her delivery. Like the performances, and the infosphere they draw on, there is no way to obtain a complete overview: all you can know is what you see or hear at the moment.